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  1. #751
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dodge View Post
    Sure amn't I getting her a card?
    Weird word that. Died out of usage in England hundreds of years ago and thus never got exported to any other part of what was the British Empire but lives on here. Although we'd all say we speak English, it's one of a number of words we use in our version of English (Hiberno English) that aren't used anywhere else in the world. Others are:

    Press (as in cupboard)
    Bold (as in a badly behaved kid)
    Footpath (pavement in England, sidewalk in America)
    Grinds (as in extra lessons)
    Runners (English call them trainers, yanks call them sneakers)
    Delph (as in plates)
    Minerals (soft drinks)

    Use any of them to an English speaker from anywhere other than Ireland in the context we do and they wouldn't have a notion what you're on about.

    Tomorrow's boring lesson: The "I before E except after C" myth

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  3. #752
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    i always say amn't

    so is it a word or not ?
    Cyril The Judas

  4. #753
    Administrator Slavia's Avatar
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    I always say Trainers

  5. #754
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slavia View Post
    I always say Trainers
    west-brit chav

    ....
    Cyril The Judas

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  7. #755
    Packie Lynch SVM's Avatar
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    had no idea only we Irish called dishes and plates"delph" ,surely that has something to do with dutch delftware no??

  8. #756
    Super Moderator Jimdagym's Avatar
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    Yanks and Brits say bold as in bad.

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    Mbabazi danthesaint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimdagym View Post
    Yanks and Brits say bold as in bad.
    ask the scot beside me, he say scots say "ya wee bastard"
    We All Dream Of A Team Of Curly Wurly's!!! A Team Of Curly Wurly's!!! A Team Of Curly Wurly's!!!

  10. #758
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheSaintsno.12 View Post
    i always say amn't

    so is it a word or not ?
    its short for am not. just like Aren't is short for are not. My favourite is wouldn't've

    As in "I wouldn't've used the word amn't if I knew it was going to be analysed"
    "We've seen you come, we'll see you go"

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  12. #759
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheSaintsno.12 View Post
    i always say amn't

    so is it a word or not ?
    Yes, in Hiberno-English but not in Modern English (basically 'official' English). We speak Hiberno-English which is 99.9% the same as Modern English but never really consciously think that we're using words specific to our dialect of English.

    Quote Originally Posted by SVM View Post
    had no idea only we Irish called dishes and plates"delph" ,surely that has something to do with dutch delftware no??
    Yes, it comes from Delft.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimdagym View Post
    Yanks and Brits say bold as in bad.
    Don't think so - I've never heard them use it in that context (unless you've met some that are of Irish descent or that picked it up from a Mick). They use the term to mean brave or brazen. Here's the dictionary.com definition - nothing there about being misbehaved which is what we mean by it.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/bold

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    SVM

  14. #760
    John McDonnell yorkiesaint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimdagym View Post
    Yanks and Brits say bold as in bad.
    Can't speak for the yanks but the Brits (hate that term) it means upstanding or standing strong or a washing powder.

  15. #761
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaz View Post
    Press (as in cupboard)
    Bold (as in a badly behaved kid)
    Footpath (pavement in England, sidewalk in America)
    Grinds (as in extra lessons)
    Runners (English call them trainers, yanks call them sneakers)
    Delph (as in plates)
    Minerals (soft drinks)
    Add to the list:
    Hot press (as in airing cupboard)
    Give out (as in scold)
    Rashers (as in bacon; dunno what they call the pink meat you eat with cabbage but "bacon" is definitely for a fry)

    Then you get into the whole business of intra-Hiberno variations like youse v ye. And even after going out with a woman from Tipp for four years, I'm still amazed at some of their local words and expressions, Clonmel-English is a completely different language even to normal Hiberno-English.

  16. #762
    John McDonnell yorkiesaint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaz View Post
    Weird word that. Died out of usage in England hundreds of years ago and thus never got exported to any other part of what was the British Empire but lives on here. Although we'd all say we speak English, it's one of a number of words we use in our version of English (Hiberno English) that aren't used anywhere else in the world. Others are:

    Press (as in cupboard)
    Bold (as in a badly behaved kid)
    Footpath (pavement in England, sidewalk in America)
    Grinds (as in extra lessons)
    Runners (English call them trainers, yanks call them sneakers)
    Delph (as in plates)
    Minerals (soft drinks)

    Use any of them to an English speaker from anywhere other than Ireland in the context we do and they wouldn't have a notion what you're on about.

    Tomorrow's boring lesson: The "I before E except after C" myth
    As ever Gaz a fountain of knowledge I always thought amn't was exclusive to Ireland.

    Just to give the opposite view

    Coursey (Pavement, as far as I'm aware this is exclusive to Yorkshire)
    Revision (Grinds)
    Pop (North of England)
    Drink (South of England)
    Grand (A thousand pounds, that's my personal favourite always gets funny looks when I'm in Barnsley)
    Cunts-Shels (some things are just universal)

    I'm sure there's lots more just can't think of any of them at the moment

    Also Red Lemonade is exclusive to Ireland, though am sure someone will have bought some in Papua New Guinea if I'm wrong.

    Batch Bread used to be exclusive to Ireland until people started bringing it home with them. I think a few supermarkets now stock it but packaged bread in England is muck.

  17. #763
    Curtis Fleming
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    Quote Originally Posted by yorkiesaint View Post
    As ever Gaz a fountain of knowledge I always thought amn't was exclusive to Ireland.

    Just to give the opposite view

    Coursey (Pavement, as far as I'm aware this is exclusive to Yorkshire)
    Revision (Grinds)
    Pop (North of England)
    Drink (South of England)
    Grand (A thousand pounds, that's my personal favourite always gets funny looks when I'm in Barnsley)
    Cunts-Shels (some things are just universal)

    I'm sure there's lots more just can't think of any of them at the moment

    Also Red Lemonade is exclusive to Ireland, though am sure someone will have bought some in Papua New Guinea if I'm wrong.

    Batch Bread used to be exclusive to Ireland until people started bringing it home with them. I think a few supermarkets now stock it but packaged bread in England is muck.
    Remember hearing something about Ireland is the only country in the EU that has it except for Poland I think. Its rotten stuff as well.

  18. #764
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    ah its fine. One of my English based cousins can't get enough of the stuff when he's over. In the IMMA shop in the royal hospital they have a posters fo Ireland section and there's one of a bottle of red lemonade. made me smile

    The other thing the English cousins adore when they're over are chicken balls. Seems to be fairly unique to Ireland (via China...)
    "We've seen you come, we'll see you go"

  19. #765
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    Quote Originally Posted by yorkiesaint View Post

    Batch Bread used to be exclusive to Ireland until people started bringing it home with them. I think a few supermarkets now stock it but packaged bread in England is muck.
    I believe 'Sliced Pan' is another term they used to use in England way back but we're the only ones using it now.

    By the way I never thought much about this until a couple of months back when I used to word 'bold' the describe a toddler running amok to my Spanish missus (who speaks near-perfect English) and she couldn't understand why I was seemingly praising the little fecker. So I went about explaining to her what the word meant only to discover it didn't mean that at all in the 'proper' English she'd learnt.
    Last edited by Gaz; 8th February 2012 at 04:05 PM.

  20. #766
    Super Moderator Jimdagym's Avatar
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    Red lemonade is liquid aspartame which puts holes in your brain. You only get it here because we are the only gobshites stupid enough to drink it.

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    Administrator Slavia's Avatar
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  22. #768
    John McDonnell yorkiesaint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaz View Post
    I believe 'Sliced Pan' is another term they used to use in England way back but we're the only ones using it now.
    In England they call it a loaf which also has different connations here

  23. #769
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gaz View Post
    By the way I never thought much about this until a couple of months back when I used to word 'bold' the describe a toddler running amok to my Spanish missus (who speaks near-perfect English) and she couldn't understand why I was seemingly praising the little fecker. So I went about explaining to her what the word meant only to discover it didn't mean that at all in the 'proper' English she'd learnt.
    Has she progressed onto the old man version of bold; bauld? As in when two old farts meet each other for the first time in a while "ah if its ins't the bauld Pee-aye-ter" "ah 'tis yourself Micka" " jemmies and pep there youngfella"
    "We've seen you come, we'll see you go"

  24. #770
    Mbabazi danthesaint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimdagym View Post
    Red lemonade is liquid aspartame which puts holes in your brain. You only get it here because we are the only gobshites stupid enough to drink it.
    hahaha remember me switching to southern comfort and white, because of this, because i felt it was too dodgy, then i realised, then i ordered 7 souther comforts at last orders in mackers one night

    red lemonade not so much of a problem haha
    We All Dream Of A Team Of Curly Wurly's!!! A Team Of Curly Wurly's!!! A Team Of Curly Wurly's!!!

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  26. #771
    John McDonnell yorkiesaint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimdagym View Post
    Red lemonade is liquid aspartame which puts holes in your brain. You only get it here because we are the only gobshites stupid enough to drink it.
    There's a soft drink that I think is peculiar to the North of England and that's Dandelion and Burdock. It's a similar colour to coke but don't be fooled it's absolutely vile

  27. #772
    John McDonnell yorkiesaint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dodge View Post
    Has she progressed onto the old man version of bold; bauld? As in when two old farts meet each other for the first time in a while "ah if its ins't the bauld Pee-aye-ter" "ah 'tis yourself Micka" " jemmies and pep there youngfella"
    Reminds of me of the Irish way of asking a question then answering it yourself as in "Ya going the bar yeah" that will get you a look as though you've two heads everywhere else

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  29. #773
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    Speaking English to foreigners trying to learn English here is hilarious. Half of the time they reckon I'm speaking Gaelic because of the different phrases and words that we use in Ireland.

  30. #774
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    Quote Originally Posted by yorkiesaint View Post
    Reminds of me of the Irish way of asking a question then answering it yourself as in "Ya going the bar yeah" that will get you a look as though you've two heads everywhere else
    that natural answer to that question is, of course, the highly sarcastic "I am yeah!", rpobably followed by "you lazy bollocks"

    I think I remember reading an article with Roddy Doyle on the problems of translating his books for sale abroad. The line that got me was "there's no such thing as bollocks in Japan"
    "We've seen you come, we'll see you go"

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  32. #775
    John McDonnell yorkiesaint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dodge View Post

    I think I remember reading an article with Roddy Doyle on the problems of translating his books for sale abroad. The line that got me was "there's no such thing as bollocks in Japan"
    Brilliant.

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    For the record, from the ages of 5-12 or so, there was no finer dining than a slice of vanilla ice cream in a glass of red lemonade
    "We've seen you come, we'll see you go"

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  35. #777
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    Quote Originally Posted by antomorro View Post
    Speaking English to foreigners trying to learn English here is hilarious. Half of the time they reckon I'm speaking Gaelic because of the different phrases and words that we use in Ireland.
    What hope have the poor Germans got,if St Robbie is teaching them English.

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  37. #778
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    Quote Originally Posted by sixtiessaint View Post
    What hope have the poor Germans got,if St Robbie is teaching them English.
    God knows. I'd say they know the vocabulary of St Patrick's Athletic off by heart now though! Not sure about anything else

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  39. #779
    Paul McGrath
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    "Do be" is also unique to Ireland, as in "I do be knackered after work," "what does he be doing in the toilet for so long?" "do you be using the Dart much these days?"

  40. #780
    John McDonnell yorkiesaint's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oleguer presas i renom View Post
    "Do be" is also unique to Ireland, as in "I do be knackered after work," "what does he be doing in the toilet for so long?" "do you be using the Dart much these days?"
    That's unique to Frank Sinatra am afraid "Strangers in the night exchanging glances
    Wond'ring in the night
    What were the chances we'd be sharing love
    Before the night was through.

    Ever since that night we've been together.
    Lovers at first sight, in love forever.
    It turned out so right,
    For strangers in the night.




    Wait for it





    Dooby Dooby Doo

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